Accessibility statement for bepartofresearch.nihr.ac.uk

Updated September 2019

Making Be Part of Research accessible

Introduction

This website was developed by the National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network and funded by the Department of Health and Social Care. We want as many people as possible to be able to use this website. For example, that means you should be able to:

  • change colours, contrast levels and fonts;
  • zoom in up to 300% without the text spilling off the screen;
  • navigate most of the website using just a keyboard;
  • navigate most of the website using speech recognition software;
  • listen to most of the website using a screen reader (including the most recent versions of JAWS, NVDA and VoiceOver);

We’ve also made the website text as simple as possible to understand.

AbilityNet has advice on making your device easier to use if you have a disability.

Note: This website’s legal name is UK Clinical Trials Gateway. It will be referred to in this document as ‘this website’ or ‘the website’ or ‘Be Part of Research’ website.

1.0 Background

An accessibility audit for Be Part of Research was carried out by the Digital Accessibility Centre (DAC) on the 22 July 2019. The Be Part of Research service was assessed against the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines WCAG 2.1The audit found a number of access issues detailed fully below. In summary, the report found:

  • Some page elements either did not contain discernible text or were not descriptive enough for users to determine their function or purpose for users who require audio feedback.
  • Mobility impaired users encountered some elements that were not accessible to standard keyboard commands or voice activation software.
  • Some of the colour combinations found on the site are low contrast and are likely to be difficult for people with low vision to read.  

The Be Part of Research website’s development team is currently working to improve the accessibility of bepartofreserach.nihr.ac.uk and resolve the issues that have been highlighted through the accessibility audit. We will update the accessibility statement as the improvements are implemented. 

How accessible is bepartofresearch.nihr.uk?

We know some parts of this website are not fully accessible: 

2.1 Getting around the site

Screen reader

  • The close icon button on the ‘ask to take part’ pop up is unlabelled. This means that screen reader users will not be able to easily identify the close option. 
  • Screen reader users are unable to access the sub menu items in the site menu.
  • The page titles do not uniquely reflect the contents of individual pages. Screen reader users are not able to identify the purpose or topic of each page. 

Keyboard

  • The ‘ask to take part’ pop up does not receive focus for keyboard only users. Users must continue to navigate the page content before accessing the pop ups content.
  • The ‘filters’ menu does not receive focus for keyboard only users. Users must continue to navigate the page content before accessing the ‘filters’ menu content.
  •  

2.2 Content

Screen reader

  • Users of NVDA screen readers cannot access video player controls.
  • Video content does not include a transcript in the video. We have included a separate link to a transcript as an interim solution.
  •  

2.3 Asking for help and providing feedback

Screen reader

  • The ‘We’d like your feedback’ buttons do not indicate their state. This means that screen reader users may be unaware of which buttons have been selected.  
  • Validation errors are not identified in a way that is accessible to all users. Although error messages are presented when validation errors occur, they are not accessible to screen reader users.
  • The six form fields under the heading ‘Help with this site’ such as ‘Name’ and ‘Email Address’ are unlabelled. This means screen reader users may not be able to complete the form as intended.

Non-accessible feature

  • We use Hotjar to learn how visitors are using this site and collect feedback. The red feedback ribbon to the right of the screen is only accessible through a mouse click.

2.4 Search and filters

Screen reader

  • When users select an option from the filters, these are added at the top of the filter section. Screen reader users would be unaware that this had occurred. 
  • The ‘Keyword…’ autocomplete search field is not accessible to screen reader users. The field can be populated with a search term, but they will be unable to search for the term before it is replaced by an item in the autocomplete list.

3.0 What to do if you can’t access parts of this website

We’re always looking to improve the accessibility of this website. If you find any problems that aren’t listed on this page or think we’re not meeting accessibility requirements, contact us by: 

Email: bepartofresearch@nihr.ac.uk

In your email please include a description of the problem, what behaviour did you expect and your full contact details include contact number.

Call: 0113 343 2314 and ask for the Be Part of Research team. 

We’ll review your request and aim to get back to you within fourteen working days.

3.1 Enforcement procedure

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is responsible for enforcing the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018 (the ‘accessibility regulations’). If you’re not happy with how we respond to your complaint, contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS).

4.0 Technical information about this website’s accessibility

The National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network is committed to making this website accessible, in accordance with the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

This website is partially compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.1 AA standard, due to the non-compliances listed below.

4.1 Level A

Non-text Content

1.1.1 All non-text content that is presented to the user has a text alternative that serves the equivalent purpose.

Captions (Pre-recorded)

1.2.2 Captions are provided for all pre-recorded audio content in synchronised media, except when the media is a media alternative for text and is clearly labelled as such.

Info and Relationships

1.3.1 Information, structure, and relationships conveyed through presentation can be programmatically determined or are available in text.

Meaningful Sequence

1.3.2 When the sequence in which content is presented affects its meaning, a correct reading sequence can be programmatically determined.

Use of Colour

1.4.1 Colour is not used as the only visual means of conveying information, indicating an action, prompting a response, or distinguishing a visual element.

Keyboard

2.1.1 All functionality of the content is operable through a keyboard interface without requiring specific timings for individual keystrokes, except where the underlying function requires input that depends on the path of the user's movement and not just the endpoints.

Bypass Blocks

2.4.1 A mechanism is available to bypass blocks of content that are repeated on multiple Web pages.

Page Titles

2.4.2 Web pages have titles that describe topic or purpose.

Focus Order

2.4.3 If a Web page can be navigated sequentially and the navigation sequences affect meaning or operation, focusable components receive focus in an order that preserves meaning and operability.

Link Purpose (In Context)

2.4.4 The purpose of each link can be determined from the link text alone or from the link text together with its programmatically determined link context, except where the purpose of the link would be ambiguous to users in general.

Label in Name

2.5.3 For user interface components with labels that include text or images of text, the name contains the text that is presented visually.

Language of Page

3.1.1 The default human language of each Web page can be programmatically determined.

Error Identification

3.3.1 If an input error is automatically detected, the item that is in error is identified and the error is described to the user in text.

Labels or Instructions

3.3.2 Labels or instructions are provided when content requires user input.

Parsing

4.1.1 In content implemented using mark-up languages, elements have complete start and end tags, elements are nested according to their specifications, elements do not contain duplicate attributes, and any IDs are unique, except where the specifications allow these features..

Name, Role, Value

4.1.2 For all user interface components (including but not limited to: form elements, links and components generated by scripts), the name and role can be programmatically determined; states, properties, and values that can be set by the user can be programmatically set; and notification of changes to these items is available to user agents, including assistive technologies.

4.2 Level AA

Contrast (Minimum)

The visual presentation of text and images of text has a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1, except for the following:

  • Large Text: Large-scale text and images of large-scale text have a contrast ratio of at least 3:1;
  • Incidental: Text or images of text that are part of an inactive user interface component, that are pure decoration, that are not visible to anyone, or that are part of a picture that contains significant other visual content, have no contrast requirement;
  • Logotypes: Text that is part of a logo or brand name has no minimum contrast requirement.

Resize text

1.4.4 Except for captions and images of text, text can be resized without assistive technology up to 200 percent without loss of content or functionality.

Images of Text

1.4.5 If the technologies being used can achieve the visual presentation, text is used to convey information rather than images of text except for the following:

Understanding Success Criterion 1.4.5

  • Customizable: The image of text can be visually customized to the user's requirements;
  • Essential: A particular presentation of text is essential to the information being conveyed.

Reflow

1.4.10 Content can be presented without loss of information or functionality, and without requiring scrolling in two dimensions for :

  • Vertical scrolling content at a width equivalent to 320 CSS pixels;
  • Horizontal scrolling content at a height equivalent to 256 CSS pixels.

 Except for parts of the content which require two-dimensional layout for usage or meaning.

 Non-text Contrast

The visual presentation of the following have a contrast ratio of at least 3:1 against adjacent color(s):

  • User Interface Components: Visual information required to identify user interface components and states, except for inactive components or where the appearance of the component is determined by the user agent and not modified by the author;
  • Graphical Objects: Parts of graphics required to understand the content, except when a particular presentation of graphics is essential to the information being conveyed.

Headings and Labels

2.4.6 Headings and labels describe topic or purpose.

Focus Visible

2.4.7 Any keyboard operable user interface has a mode of operation where the keyboard focus indicator is visible.

Error Suggestion

3.3.3 If an input error is automatically detected and suggestions for correction are known, then the suggestions are provided to the user, unless it would jeopardize the security or purpose of the content.

Status Messages

4.1.3 In content implemented using mark-up languages, status messages can be programmatically determined through role or properties such that they can be presented to the user by assistive technologies without receiving focus.

5.1 Non compliance with the accessibility regulations

The content listed below is non-accessible for the following reasons.

Level A / Level AA denotes the level of conformance to the success criteria.

Accessibility issues

1.1.1 Non text content and 2.4.4 Link Purpose in context

  • The web page links and image links related to the ‘Real life stories’ articles such as ‘Harry’ and ‘Photo of infant child’ are ambiguous. Screen reader users may not be able to determine their destination or purpose (Level A) 
  • The ‘In this blog’ link under ‘Getting involved in research was a no-brainer’ is not descriptive of its destination or purpose when navigating out of context (Level A) 
  • The ‘Wendy Mitchell’ link is not descriptive enough for screen reader users to determine its destination or purpose when navigating out of context. (Level A) 
  • The ‘NIHR Logo – National Institute for Health Research’ and ‘Be Part of Research Logo’ links direct users to the same place despite containing different link text.(Level A)
  • The image alts provided for the images presented under ‘Latest News’ were confusing to our screen reader users as they duplicated surrounding link text and appear to be decorative.(Level A)

 1.2.2 Captions (Pre-recorded) 

  • The video presented under the heading ‘How to be involved’ does not include closed captions or a transcript of the video’s audio content which means people who are deaf or hard of hearing may be struggle to watch and understand the video.(Level A)

1.3.1 Info and relationships, 3.3.2 Labels or Instructions and 4.1.2 Name, Role and Value

  • The chevron buttons adjacent to the links within the hamburger menus are unlabelled and do not indicate to screen reader users that they are expandable or collapsible. This means that screen reader users may not be able to determine the form controls function or purpose. (Level A)
  • The list items in the ‘Filters’ menu are unlabelled and do not indicate to screen reader users that they are expandable or collapsible. This means that screen reader users may not be able to determine the form controls function or purpose. (Level A)
  • The six form fields under the heading ‘Help with this site’ such as ‘Name’ and ‘Email
  • Address’ are unlabelled which means that screen reader users may not be able to determine the form controls function or purpose. (Level A)
  • The close icon button related to the ‘Ask to take part’ modal layer is unlabelled which means that screen reader users will not able to determine the form controls function or purpose (Level A) 
  • The ‘Distance’ select field is unlabelled which means that users of assistive technologies will not be able to access or understand the forms purpose. (Level A)

1.3.1 Info and relationships

  • There were hidden links present that were not visible on screen. However, screen reader users were able to access them due to the way in which they had been hidden. These links were also empty and pseudo content had been used to display information that assistive technologies cannot access. (Level A)
  • The ‘Filter’ menu presents expandable link elements that contain related checkboxes. However, the related checkboxes are not grouped together using a fieldset and legend which means that screen reader users may not be able to determine their function or purpose when navigating out of context.(Level A)

1.3.2 Meaningful sequence

The menu item appears after the heading ‘I’m looking for research about’ (which relates to the search feature) but before the search edit fields. This was confusing and did not make sense to users that navigate within the context of the page. (Level A)

1.4.1 Use of colour 

Visited links such as ‘Read the full story’ are not visually identifiable because the contrast between the link text and surrounding body text is insufficient and the link text does not include any other distinguishable characteristics. This means that some people may not be able to identify visited links.(Level A)

1.4.3 Contrast minimum

  • The ‘Your feedback’ link related to the ‘Welcome to our new site’ message has insufficient colour contrast of 3.93 (foreground colour: #007dc2, background colour: #eff1f3, font size: 13.2pt, font weight: normal). The expected minimum colour contrast ratio for text of this size and weight is 4.5:1. This applies to every instance where this colour combination, point size and weight occurs. (Level AA)
  • The ‘Your feedback’ link related to the ‘Welcome to our new site’ message has insufficient colour contrast of 3.93 (foreground colour: #007dc2, background colour: #eff1f3, font size: 13.2pt, font weight: normal). The expected minimum colour contrast ratio for text of this size and weight is 4.5:1. This applies to every instance where this colour combination, point size and weight occurs. (Level AA))
  • The ‘Research changes lives’ heading has insufficient colour contrast of 4.45 (foreground colour: #007dc2, background colour: #ffffff, font size: 15.8pt, font weight: normal). The expected minimum colour contrast ratio for text of this size and weight is 4.5:1. This applies to every instance where this colour combination, point size and weight occurs. (Level AA)
  • Every other link to a study in the list of ‘All Studies’ search results has insufficient colour contrast of 3.93 (foreground colour: #007dc2, background colour: #eff1f3, font size: 15.8pt, font weight: normal). The expected minimum colour contrast ratio for text of this size and weight is 4.5:1. This applies to every instance where this colour combination, point size and weight occurs. (Level AA) 
  • The bold text, ‘Female’ and ’18 Year – 100 Years’ under ‘Recruiting’ have insufficient colour contrast of 4.45 (foreground colour: #007dc2, background colour: #ffffff, font size: 13.2pt, font weight: bold). The expected minimum colour contrast ratio for text of this size and weight is 4.5:1. This applies to every instance where this colour combination, point size and weight occurs. (Level AA)

1.4.4 Resize text

The list of autocomplete suggestions related to the ‘Location’ form field does not enlarge when the page is magnified to 200%. This means that people with low vision may be unable to read the autocomplete suggestions without the use of assistive technology. (Level AA)

1.4.5 Images of text

The image of text ‘Behind The Headlines’ under ‘Latest news’ cannot be adjusted. This means that people who require a particular visual presentation of text are not able to adjust the presentation of text as needed. (Level AA)

1.4.10 Reflow

  • Some of the content related to the cookies policy is truncated when the page is magnified to 400% and the width is set to 1280px. This means that users are unable to read all of the information related to the cookies policy in a single column and can only access the main content of the page by accepting the cookies policy.(Level AA)
  • The list of autocomplete suggestions related to the ‘Location’ form field does not enlarge when the page is magnified to 400% and the width is set to 1280px. This means that people with low vision may be unable to read the autocomplete suggestions when the page is viewed in a single column.(Level AA)

1.4.11 Non-text contrast

  • The ‘Close Informational’ button icon has insufficient colour contrast of approximately  1.26:1 (foreground colour: #eff1f3, background colour: #c1dde0). The expected minimum contrast ratio of meaningful graphics is 3:1. (Level AA)
  • The map location icons above ‘Cities/Towns’ associated with each search result insufficient colour contrast of approximately 2.33:1 (foreground colour: #f29330, background colour: #ffffff). The expected minimum contrast ratio of meaningful graphics is 3:1. (Level AA)
  • The borders of the six form fields related to ‘Help with this site’ online form have insufficient colour contrast of approximately 1.32:1 (foreground colour: #e0e0e0, background colour: #ffffff). The expected minimum contrast ratio of meaningful graphics is 3:1. 1.4.11 (Level AA)
  • The ‘Menu’, ‘Search for study’ and ‘View conditions’ buttons present a custom focus indicator that has insufficient colour contrast of approximately 1.27:1 (foreground colour: #134D95, background colour: #193E72). This means that some users may not be able to determine when the elements are in focus. The expected minimum contrast ratio of meaningful graphics is 3:1. (Level AA) 
  • A similar issue to above (DAC_Low_Non-Text_Contrast_Issue2) also applies to the custom focus indicator related to the search results ‘Filters’ elements. For example, the ‘Show results’ button focus indicator has insufficient colour contrast of approximately 1.27:1 (foreground colour: #134D95, background colour: #193E72). The expected minimum contrast ratio of meaningful graphics is 3:1.(Level AA)

2.4.1 Bypass Blocks 

A ‘Skip to main content’ link is not available which means users are unable to bypass the navigation elements and bypass directly to the main content of the page. (Level A)

2.4.2 Page titles

Page titles do not uniquely describe or introduce the page content throughout the website. (Level A)

2.4.3 Focus order

  • The order in which page elements receive focus is not logical. (Level A)
  • The ‘Ask to take part’ modal layer does not receive focus when it is presented. Users must continue to navigate the page content behind the model layer before accessing its contents. (Level A)
  • The ‘Filters’ menu layer does not receive focus when it is presented. Users must continue to navigate the page content behind the layer before accessing the contents. (Level A)
  • The focus order of elements related to the ‘Record numbers take part in research’ article is not logical. Focus arrives at the ‘Record numbers take part in research’ heading link and ‘Read the full story’ link before the ‘870,250 participants in research in 18/19’ image link above them. Users would expect the image link to receive focus before the following two links because it is presented before them visually. (Level A)
  • The focus order of the elements within the studies pages such as ‘Multicentre Cohort Study in Alcoholic Hepatitis’ is not logical because users must navigate the main content of the page before arriving at the ‘Print or download’ button. Users would expect the ‘Print or download’ button to receive focus before the main content because it is presented before them visually. (Level A)
  • The focus order of elements related to the ‘Your expertise along with our expertise is a winning formula’ article. Users would expect the image link to receive focus before the following two links because it is presented before them visually. (Level A)


2.4.4 Link Purpose – in context 

  • The map location icons above ‘Cities/Towns’ associated with each search result do not contain discernible link text which means that screen reader users may not be able to determine their destination or purpose. This appears to apply to map location icons throughout the service.  (Level A)
  • The ‘Read Study Details’ links are not uniquely descriptive of their destinations which means screen reader users may not be able to differentiate between them when navigating out of context.(Level A))

2.4.6 Headings and labels

  • Similar input fields that contain duplicate aria-labels are present in the search facility. The duplicate ‘Text input to search for a keyword (e.g. cancer or a drug name)’ edit fields confused some screen reader users who were unable to determine their function or purpose. (Level AA)
  • The answers to the ‘We’d like your feedback’ questions are marked up as submit buttons and present a confirmation dialog upon input which is not expected behaviour. However, the answers are not descriptive enough for screen reader users to determine their function or purpose when navigating out of context. (Level AA)
  • Multiple generic ‘Cities/Towns’ buttons are present which are not descriptive enough for screen reader users to determine their function or purpose when navigating out of context. The buttons also do not indicate that they are expandable which means users may be unaware that additional content will become available when selected.  (Level AA)
  • Multiple generic ‘Remove Filter’ buttons are present which are not descriptive enough for screen reader users to determine their function or purpose when navigating out of context. The buttons also do not indicate that they are expandable which means users may be unaware that additional content will become available when selected. (Level AA)

2.5.3 Label in name 

  • The six form fields under the heading ‘Help with this site’ such as ‘Email Address’ and Category’ are unlabelled which means that voice activation users cannot navigate to some fields by giving the click command and their visible text labels. (Level A)
  • The ‘Distance’ select field is unlabelled which means that voice activation users cannot navigate to some fields by giving the click command and the visible text label.  (Level A)

 3.1.1 Language of Page

The ‘About us’ page does not include a language attribute which means screen reader software will not be able to identify the primary language of the page. If the language of a webpage is not specified, the screen reader assumes the default language set by the user. (Level A). 

4.1.2 Name, Role, Value

  • The ‘Keyword...’ autocomplete search field is not accessible to all users. Although screen reader users were able to populate the edit field with a search term. These users were unaware that a list of suggestions were available and unable to access them. (Level A)
  • The hamburger menu button does not indicate to users that it is expandable or collapsible. This means that users cannot determine its functionality and may be unaware that additional information is available when selected.(Level A)
  • The collapsible links on the study page ‘Who can take part’ do not indicate to users that they are expandable or collapsible. This means that some users who cannot determine their functionality may be unaware that additional information is available when selected. (Level A)
  • The ‘We’d like your feedback’ buttons do not programmatically indicate their state. This means that screen reader users may be unaware of which buttons have been selected. (Level A))

4.1.3 Status Messages 

When users selected an option from the filters, these were added at the top of the filter section above the form field used to make the selection. Screen reader users were unaware that this had occurred and that their option had been successfully added. (Level AA)

Accessibility issues affecting multiple guidelines

  • Validation errors are not identified in a way that is accessible to all users. Although error messages are presented when validation errors occur, they are not accessible to screen reader users and do not conform with the NHS digital services recommendations. This appears to be consistent throughout the service. (WCAG 3.3.1 Error Identification (Level A), 3.3.3 Error Suggestion (Level AA)
  • Landmark roles (or "landmarks") programmatically identify sections of a page. However, these were not all present. Landmarks help assistive technology (AT) users orient themselves to a page and help them navigate easily to various sections of a page. (WCAG 1.3.1 Info and Relationships (Level A), 2.4.1 Bypass Blocks (Level A)
  • The video player presented under the heading ‘How to be involved’ is not available to JAWS users when navigating either in or out of context. This means that some users may be unaware of the video’s presence on the page.  (WCAG 1.3.1 Info and Relationships (Level A), 3.3.2 Labels or Instructions, (Level A) 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value (Level A)
  • When using NVDA, users were able to access the video player controls and understand their function or purpose. However, when the video is playing, NVDA users are then unable to access the video controls in context. (WCAG 1.3.1 Info and Relationships (Level A), 3.3.2 Labels or Instructions (Level A),  4.1.2 Name, Role, Value (Level A)

5.2 Disproportionate burden

The following accessibility problems would be a disproportionate burden to address at this time.  We’ve reported the issue to Hotjar who responded stated that it is a known limitation in their feedback tools. They have not been able to provide at this time details of a resolution.

  • The Hotjar ‘Feedback’ element is only accessible to mouse commands which means it is not accessible to all users. This is because a non-interactive <div> element has been used and the roles, states and behaviours are not exposed to the accessibility API that assistive technologies use to access and interact with elements. 2.1.1 Keyboard (Level A), 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value (Level A)
  • The Hotjar ‘Feedback’ text has insufficient colour contrast of 3.4 (foreground colour: #ffffff, background colour: #ea5d4e, font size: 9.8pt, font weight: normal). The expected minimum colour contrast ratio for text of this size and weight is 4.5:1. This applies to every instance where this colour combination, point size and weight occurs. 1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum) (Level AA)
  • Some of the content related to the Hotjar ‘Feedback’ modal is truncated when the page is magnified u p to 400% and the width is set to 1280px. This means that users are unable to read all of the information related to the cookies policy in a single column and can only access the main content of the page by refreshing the page or selecting one of the visible feedback emotions. 1.4.10 Reflow (Level AA)
  • The Hotjar ‘Feedback’ element is not highlighted by a visible focus indicator when in focus. This means that keyboard only users may struggle to determine where their focus is on the page. This is due to the use of a non-interactive element. 2.4.7 Focus Visible (Level AA)


5.3 Content that’s not within the scope of the accessibility regulations

Accessibility problems that fall outside the scope of the accessibility regulations which of the WCAG 2.1 AA success criteria the problem fails on:

Trial feeds:

Be Part of Research relies on two study feeds as its main data source. These feeds are sourced from ISRCTN and clinicaltrials.gov. The content of these feeds is outside of control of our site, and for example may not use language that can be universally understood by users and therefore this content would not meet WCAG 2.1 success criterion 3.1.5 Reading Level (Level AAA), and 3.1.3 Unusual Words (Level AAA). 

6.0 How we tested this website

This website was last tested on 22nd July 2019. The test was carried out by the Digital Accessibility Centre.

We tested the main user journey users would take in identifying a research opportunity to join and find information about research. In addition we tested the user journey to contact the team via contact form on the about page. This covered all the templates used in the site.

We tested our main website platform, available at bepartofresearch.nihr.ac.uk also available at www.bepartofresearch.uk, ukctg.nihr.ac.uk.

If you'd like to read the full accessibility test report please email us at bepartofresearch@nihr.ac.uk

7.0 What we’re doing to improve accessibility

We are currently working with our IT supplier to develop a plan for implementing high priority improvements to the website by March 2020. We will share progress updates when available.

This statement was prepared on 11 September 2019. It is due to be updated on 11 September 2020.